The Misconceptions We Reinforce When Talking to Children about Disability, and Solutions

Itzel and Javi Last school year my youngest daughter befriended a young boy, Jonathan in her class with Down Syndrome. A few months into the school year she and my older daughter were having regular conversation about playing with Jonathan. Throughout that stretch of time I was met by periodic questions and comments about why Jonathan. Why doesn’t Jonathan say words? Why does Jonathan have different rules than other children? Why does Jonathan have his own teacher? Many times the questions came across as rhetorical. It sounded like the came out of a conversation that the teachers had with the students. The questions were more about receiving confirmation from me, a former early childhood special educator and researcher of high-quality inclusive education. But I wasn’t confirming what other adults were telling them. Most often, I was clarifying misconceptions.

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Filling a Cracked Bucket

cracked bucketRecently, I’ve been discovering that my techniques and strategies to talk with my soon to be eight-year-old are insufficient. For the past couple of years when I have been asked a question about this confusing complex world we live in I pulled ideas form books, television shows, and movies she was familiar with. She was engaged and the conversations never had a conclusion.  It was open for ongoing follow-up questions from either of us. While I continue to use the past books, television shows and movies her questions are requiring me to go beyond the immediate content and extend it to abstract concepts that go beyond the storylines.  In short, Daniel Tiger, Zootopia and Have you Filled a Bucket Today are a bit too simple for my daughter…but that doesn’t mean they don’t continue to be the foundation of our conversations.  It is the idea of creating a foundation early on that is central to discussing (in)justice and (in)equity with young children.

The most recent challenge occurred when she asked me, “Why don’t we adopt a child who is in foster care.  They need families.” As usual, I had to pause and consider a formulated response that made sense to my experiences. Continue reading

Why Don’t We Ever See Children With Disabilities at the Playground?

Don't call me specialAbout a week ago, I was supervising my daughters as they played on a playground.  This was a new playground for us.  It was pretty typical.  A ground cover of wood chips, slides, bars to climb across, walls to climb up, etc.  They also had six swings, two for babies and toddlers, two traditional and, less common two adaptive swings.  These swings are typically blue or red, look like an upright reclining chair, and have four chains connecting them to the cross bar; two in the front and two in the back.  They are designed to support children who do not have the size, core strength or muscle tone to sit on the other swings. Also rare for playgrounds were the rubber walkway/ramps that wove through the wood chips.  Each ramp lead to a piece of playground equipment.  I took brief notice of these features, but I didn’t consider them something worth pointing out to the children.  I was wrong.

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The Re-imagining IEP and IFSP Meetings

This article was originally published at https://kristiepf.com/the-elephant-we-fail-to-see-guest-blog/

KPF blog Feature-Image

It was mid-April. The speech pathologist, occupational therapist, school psychologist, family and I, the early childhood special educator, were gathered around a large round table two feet off the ground, all sitting in child-sized chairs for Jose’s kindergarten transition meeting. It was our fifth of seven kindergarten transition meetings that spring.

Twenty-minutes after the meeting had begun, it was over. Jose’s mother had walked out of the room crying.  His father followed behind her. The transition team was silent for a few moments. Then, Edgar, the school psychologist, looked at the team and said, “It’s hard to complete a transition meeting if the family doesn’t see the reality of their child’s disability?”

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When You Need to Talk About Suicide

The love huntSeveral months ago a colleague of my wife tragically died by suicide.  My wife and I talked about it a few times, but the conversations were brief, especially around the children.  However, we were aware that they heard some of our dialogue.  Nonetheless, neither asked for more information…at the time.

Death is something we have discussed with our seven-year-old countless times.  It became a regular topic of conversation after watching the children’s movies The Book of Life and Coco, which both have a narrative based on the afterlife.  But we have never talked about death in the context of suicide…that is until a month or so ago. Continue reading

Were European Colonialists and Native American People Friends?

pocahontas_668_330_80_int_s_c1This morning my daughter asked, seemingly out of nowhere and initially rhetorically, “Why weren’t the Native American people and Europeans friends?”

“Why do you think they weren’t friends,” I asked.

“Well, I think they were friends, but not all of them.”

I drove in silence, unsure of what to say. I thought about my knowledge of the trail of tears, Indian boarding schools, the Indian Appropriation Act and a few personal stories shared with me when I worked with families living on the Pasqua Yaqui Reservation in Tucson, Arizona. Everything was part of the tragedies and acts of violence inflicted upon indigenous populations by White people on “Turtle Island,” which is what many native people call North America. I was also aware of a few historical accounts of relatively positive relationships between native people and colonialists…however those often relied on native people becoming Christian and “civilized.”

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Child Sex…Trafficking?

Child sex traffickingSince our children were infants, we have always talked about human sexuality bluntly.  We refer to body parts using the anatomically correct name, we don’t hide or shame the early sexual curiosity, and babies do not come from storks.  Of course, at six years old when my oldest asked, “Daddy, I know babies grow inside their mommies belly and come out of their mommy’s vagina, but how do they get in there?” I turned flush red and surprised the children with the news that mommy was coming home with donuts.  I was very relieved that she forgot she asked the question…especially since that is very, very unusual.  She has not asked since…but when she does, I’m a little more prepared, because I know it is critical to talk about sex when children are young.  However, when she asked me about child sex trafficking, I was not prepared.

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Stereotypes, Bias, Prejudice, and Discrimination: Explaining “Normal” to a Seven Year Old

Separate is never equal

A few months back, after reading the book Separate is Never Equal, my daughter, Addi asked me:

“Daddy, why are the white people so rude to Sylvia’s family?”

My initial thought was, “that’s an easy one.  We’ve talked about racism and discrimination so many times.  I can reference back to many of our previous conversations.”  However, the answer that came out of my mouth was a little more nuanced than usual. “Because Sylvia’s family does not like what is normal for their school district.”

As I moved throughout the rest of my evening, and for several months to follow, I asked myself, “what is normal?” My goal was to advance Addi and my conversations about prejudice, discrimination and inclusion as well as develop a better understanding of the social world she/we live in?

What unfolded over time was the creation of the Cycle of Normal…and a daughter who is more aware of prejudice and discrimination.

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When Your Child Discovers Derogatory Words

Child cussingMy daughter discovered a new weapon in her arsenal of language.  Sister, you’re an idiot!  Daddy, don’t be an idiot! Mommy’s an idiot!

Several years back, a good friend of mine introduced me to the terms “teeth and claws words.”  These are the words that can hurt people.  That worked great until my daughter began hearing cuss words tossed around on the school playground this year. Continue reading

Do all Muslim Women Wear Hijabs?

MalalaMy daughter’s favorite book for the past two months has been “For the right to learn: Malala Yousafzai’s story.” So it wasn’t all that surprising when, on our way to the grocery store this afternoon she asked, “Do all Muslim women have to wear a hijab?” Continue reading